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How To Help Your Anxious Child Grow Through Failure

Watch this video to discover why (and how) to help your anxious child accept failure and let go of expecting things to be a certain way

One of the greatest ways you can help your anxious child is to encourage them to accept failure and let go of expecting everything to be exactly the way they want things to be.

This can be easier said than done, so in the video below I share with you some of the most powerful TOOLS you can use to help you with this.

Best of all…

…you have EVERY ONE of these tools available to you RIGHT NOW… and they’re FREE.

Once you start using these tools, I’m sure you’ll see the potential they offer to help your anxious child, and to transform their life, and yours.

Hello, it's Sue Stevenson here. Today I want to talk to you about letting go of trying to be perfect.

Do you have a child who's afraid of making a mistake?

Perhaps your child's afraid of sitting tests or exams or speaking up in class or being told off by their teacher. Or perhaps they're afraid of feeling stupid if they get something wrong.

Well, perhaps your child worries a lot about what other people think, so they're always trying to please people and come across as perfect.

When Fear Holds Your Child Bac

I heard a mum talking about her daughter the other day and her daughter had a free dress day at school. She just couldn't decide what to wear for fear of being judged by her peers. So she was really resisting going to school.

Another parent told me that her son was obsessed with getting his hair just right.

And a 15 year old girl I know spends an hour and a half every morning before school trying to get her hair and makeup perfect, which drives her parents crazy.

Now, if fear is holding your child back and your child has become a people pleaser or is constantly worried about getting things perfect for fear of being judged, here's what I want you to do to help your anxious child..

The First Step

Firstly, accept imperfection in yourself.

Tell your child that it's okay to fail. Explain to them that we all learn from our mistakes, and tell your child you don't expect them to be perfect. Assure your child that it doesn't matter if they make mistakes. You love them and just want them to be happy, and that's awesome. Go you!

Now, I want you to ask yourself though…

…how do you feel when you make a mistake?

Or perhaps when your house is a mess and unexpected visitors arrive?

Or how do you feel being seen out in public without makeup on?

Or do you ever find yourself striving for perfection, worrying about what other people think?

Do you ever redo things or put a lot of energy into getting something just right?

Do you ever find yourself comparing yourself to other parents wanting to be the perfect parent yourself, yet feeling far from it?


If so, perhaps you are having trouble accepting imperfection in yourself. So I encourage you to let go of trying to be perfect because this will really help your child.

So stuff up and start feeling comfortable with that.

The Second Step

Secondly, make sure your actions match your words.

You see, it doesn't matter what you say about it being okay for your child to fail or make mistakes if your child witnesses you being a perfectionist. Or if you ever do worry about what others think, the words you say about making mistakes will not actually carry any weight.

As the saying goes, you have to walk the talk or your child simply won't trust you or believe those words that you're saying.

Summing It UP

So in a nutshell, if you have a child who fears making mistakes and has a fear of not being good enough or worries about what others think of them, and you know it would benefit you to let go of being perfect, this is what you do.

You need to accept imperfection in yourself regardless of what others think, and start role modeling that to your child.

Then secondly, make sure your actions match your words and start showing your child that you do feel comfortable with your own failings and imperfections.

Now, I used to be very anxious about stuffing up and not being good enough myself. And when I realised I was passing this problem onto my kids, I decided to make this a priority to focus on, which really helped myself and my children.

So I encourage you to take this positive action if it resonates for you in any way. I trust this video has helped you today.

See other posts like this one:

Sunday, April 14, 2024

Do Time Outs Really Work?

Are time outs truly effective in teaching children valuable lessons, or do they inadvertently hinder kids’ learning and emotional growth? Many parents and educators rely on time outs as a disciplinary tool, but does this method work for our kids? Join me as we explore time outs' effectiveness and discover alternative approaches that prioritise empathy and understanding.

Sunday, March 24, 2024

Discover How 3 Easy Steps Can Help Your Anxious Child Thrive

In the realm of children's anxiety, the concept of contagion takes on a profound significance. Children often catch anxiety from their environment, absorbing fears and uncertainties from parents, peers, and the world around them.

Sunday, March 03, 2024

A Mother's Journey from Heartache to Healing

Do you want to have more joy in your family? Today, I'm opening up about something very personal, something I've never shared quite like this before. I'm going to share a lesson that not only comes from our weekly parenting classes but also from my own journey.

How To Help Your Anxious Child Grow Through Failure

Watch this video to discover why (and how) to help your anxious child accept failure and let go of expecting things to be a certain way

One of the greatest ways you can help your anxious child is to encourage them to accept failure and let go of expecting everything to be exactly the way they want things to be.

This can be easier said than done, so in the video below I share with you some of the most powerful TOOLS you can use to help you with this.

Best of all…

…you have EVERY ONE of these tools available to you RIGHT NOW… and they’re FREE.

Once you start using these tools, I’m sure you’ll see the potential they offer to help your anxious child, and to transform their life, and yours.

Hello, it's Sue Stevenson here. Today I want to talk to you about letting go of trying to be perfect.

Do you have a child who's afraid of making a mistake?

Perhaps your child's afraid of sitting tests or exams or speaking up in class or being told off by their teacher. Or perhaps they're afraid of feeling stupid if they get something wrong.

Well, perhaps your child worries a lot about what other people think, so they're always trying to please people and come across as perfect.

When Fear Holds Your Child Bac

I heard a mum talking about her daughter the other day and her daughter had a free dress day at school. She just couldn't decide what to wear for fear of being judged by her peers. So she was really resisting going to school.

Another parent told me that her son was obsessed with getting his hair just right.

And a 15 year old girl I know spends an hour and a half every morning before school trying to get her hair and makeup perfect, which drives her parents crazy.

Now, if fear is holding your child back and your child has become a people pleaser or is constantly worried about getting things perfect for fear of being judged, here's what I want you to do to help your anxious child..

The First Step

Firstly, accept imperfection in yourself.

Tell your child that it's okay to fail. Explain to them that we all learn from our mistakes, and tell your child you don't expect them to be perfect. Assure your child that it doesn't matter if they make mistakes. You love them and just want them to be happy, and that's awesome. Go you!

Now, I want you to ask yourself though…

…how do you feel when you make a mistake?

Or perhaps when your house is a mess and unexpected visitors arrive?

Or how do you feel being seen out in public without makeup on?

Or do you ever find yourself striving for perfection, worrying about what other people think?

Do you ever redo things or put a lot of energy into getting something just right?

Do you ever find yourself comparing yourself to other parents wanting to be the perfect parent yourself, yet feeling far from it?


If so, perhaps you are having trouble accepting imperfection in yourself. So I encourage you to let go of trying to be perfect because this will really help your child.

So stuff up and start feeling comfortable with that.

The Second Step

Secondly, make sure your actions match your words.

You see, it doesn't matter what you say about it being okay for your child to fail or make mistakes if your child witnesses you being a perfectionist. Or if you ever do worry about what others think, the words you say about making mistakes will not actually carry any weight.

As the saying goes, you have to walk the talk or your child simply won't trust you or believe those words that you're saying.

Summing It UP

So in a nutshell, if you have a child who fears making mistakes and has a fear of not being good enough or worries about what others think of them, and you know it would benefit you to let go of being perfect, this is what you do.

You need to accept imperfection in yourself regardless of what others think, and start role modeling that to your child.

Then secondly, make sure your actions match your words and start showing your child that you do feel comfortable with your own failings and imperfections.

Now, I used to be very anxious about stuffing up and not being good enough myself. And when I realised I was passing this problem onto my kids, I decided to make this a priority to focus on, which really helped myself and my children.

So I encourage you to take this positive action if it resonates for you in any way. I trust this video has helped you today.

See other posts like this one:

Sunday, April 14, 2024

Do Time Outs Really Work?

Are time outs truly effective in teaching children valuable lessons, or do they inadvertently hinder kids’ learning and emotional growth? Many parents and educators rely on time outs as a disciplinary tool, but does this method work for our kids? Join me as we explore time outs' effectiveness and discover alternative approaches that prioritise empathy and understanding.

Sunday, March 24, 2024

Discover How 3 Easy Steps Can Help Your Anxious Child Thrive

In the realm of children's anxiety, the concept of contagion takes on a profound significance. Children often catch anxiety from their environment, absorbing fears and uncertainties from parents, peers, and the world around them.

Sunday, March 03, 2024

A Mother's Journey from Heartache to Healing

Do you want to have more joy in your family? Today, I'm opening up about something very personal, something I've never shared quite like this before. I'm going to share a lesson that not only comes from our weekly parenting classes but also from my own journey.

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